Did Stan Lee leave true lasting impact?

Serious and MATURE conversations about Christianity
Post Reply

Did you like this crossover content?

Poll ended at December 4th, 2018, 5:53 pm

Yes
2
50%
No
1
25%
...not sure?
0
No votes
Leave Discord stuff on Discord
1
25%
Other (see comments)
0
No votes
 
Total votes: 4

User avatar
ShaddaShk
Council Member
Council Member
Posts: 588
Joined: January 9th, 2015, 4:22 pm
Steam Profile: ShaddaShk
Location: TX, USA
Contact:

Did Stan Lee leave true lasting impact?

Post by ShaddaShk » November 13th, 2018, 5:51 pm

A discussion started on Discord about the lasting impact of a writer. Other related subjects were touched on. I've tried grabbing and posting the important parts of the discussion, leaving out some of the minor back and forth - one can always look back on Discord for that. Please feel free to add anything you think I missed.

The opening question was provided by Kratos and reads:
Spoiler! :
Serious question that is meant to make us think, not to pander to anyone or put anyone down: Stan Lee came up with some brilliant ideas. He's world renowned for his ideas and putting those ideas into practice. The world will mourn his death because that's what we do when someone famous dies. Did he leave a true lasting impact though? My question is, how different would the world be without Stan Lee? Would it be different and if so, would it be worse? Our society has very, very strange priorities, no? Police officers, soldiers, civilians all die on a regular basis defending our freedoms, protecting our homeland, or protecting our homeland freedoms and society. Will those be mourned with the same passion? Stan Lee dying is a terrible thing, I'd agree. But what does it say about us as a people that we are more concerned about a famous comic book creator, than civilians that died unfairly because of an evil person? Or because an evil person killed a police officer? Or because an opposing soldier got a better shot off?
Kesarahk
Spoiler! :
For me, Kratos, the significance of Stan Lee's death is that he was to some extent a keeper of our dreams. His stories and the heroism that his characters (not necessarily he himself) embodied helped some of us to get through very difficult times in our childhood. I would wager that some of those police officers, soldiers, and civilians in tough situations looked to the stories at times to help them through otherwise dark days, just as there are people who endured through long-term illnesses by drawing strength from childhood heroes such as Optimus Prime.
I would not say that Stan Lee himself is more important than any one of those soldiers, public servants, or citizens. I would say that the ideals represented in the stories that we remember him for are arguably more important than any one of us.
Tourquilian
Spoiler! :
Was catching up on chat. Was going to answer what Kes said ^^'
Kratos
Spoiler! :
I don't disagree with that, I don't. I have a hard time with the significance of what he accomplished. Sure, he made some great stories and he's more widely known than any particular soldier/police officer/random civilian. So of course, more people will mourn his death solely because he's more known, but my question is, what does it say about us as a people (keeping in mind, that I don't personally grieve more for any of my examples than I would assume you all do) that we are more impacted by a man that physically did not sacrifice himself for us, while people who DID make the ultimate sacrifice for us, do not get equal representation? (there's a Jesus metaphor here somewhere... wink )
ShaddaShk
Spoiler! :
I would say we are more impacted by NON-physical things then physical
even with police officers, we are impacted by their courage, honor, dignity... not necessarily physical attributes. Which says a lot about us as people I think
I'd argue that it isn't that Stan Lee is more significant than a police officer, just that the non physical things that we rally around is more noticeable in a storyteller. When I tell stories, I am usually giving a piece of myself to the story. Just as a police officer gives part of himself to his dedication and job
SkyeRangerDelta
Spoiler! :
Has no connection to Stan Lee whatsoever because he never got into comics/superheros in the slightest. Does not denounce any sort of legacy Lee may have had though
Kratos
Spoiler! :
It isn't the same, though, Shadda.
A police officer may not go home to his/her family.
Kesarahk
Spoiler! :
I would agree that it cost Stan Lee a good deal less to help people than it costs a public servant or soldier. In fact he was well paid for his efforts, and I wouldn't argue that everything he did had good motives or even that he was necessarily a good person. I think the significance of what he accomplished was showcasing virtues and values which we all innately know we should emulate, and giving us cultural touchstones around which to have conversations about fairness, sacrifice, integrity, human equality, the worthiness of the disabled and disadvantaged and of children.
That may not even have been his intent, and if he had had to pursue it in the face of opposition and danger, who knows if he would have.
Shaddashk
Spoiler! :
I am not arguing against the very importance of police officers, soldiers and such
but to say someone who is NOT a soldier or police officer is somehow less brave is also not going on the same argument
Kratos
Spoiler! :
They are less brave, at least their actions are less courageous.
Less brave may not be the best phrase, but their actions don't require the same level of sacrifice.
Kesarahk
Spoiler! :
Also, Kratos, I don't think anyone here is going to argue that American values are not generally shallow and self-centered, thus entertainers as such are likely to be valued more than people who actually give of themselves in a self sacrificing way.
Shaddashk
Spoiler! :
Okay, the impression I'm getting from this is "what significance did someone who is not a police officer did"? and I'm trying to point out that not just police officers have significance just because they put themselves on the line
I would say that is only acknowledging physical sacrifice. If we are talking about Stan Lee himself, he probably wasn't the best person. I think people are more morning the loss of the stories he made more than him himself
Kratos
Spoiler! :
As I stated in that sentence, that isn't a good phrase. But the actions being discussed are more courageous than others.
I thought I did a pretty good job retracting the statement and rephrasing.
However, a comic book creator VS someone who actually puts their life on the line as per their job, do not have the same level of sacrifice.

GA Contempt
Spoiler! :
But you still believe it isn't as big a sacrifice as being a police officer. Personally I'd rather be shot and killed than be publically mocked for the rest of my life because I tried to give certain people rights (which could have happened).
Kratos
Spoiler! :
My point was, that a nation will mourn a death today. A large portion of society will grieve and post on face book and even cry over the loss of Stan Lee. While I don't even disagree that some of that is warranted, my point is that there are people that have sacrificed everything for us to be here and have this conversation. I think they deserve as much grief as Stan Lee. My only point.
GA Contempt
Spoiler! :
But to go back to the original point, "Did he leave a true lasting impact though?" absolutely. Even if he didn't physically accomplish as much as some police officers, he's going to leave a much bigger and greater legacy that will inspire others.
Tourquilian
Spoiler! :
One could argue that we all have our place in life, and it is God's place to judge the worth of our station.
Winged Scribe
Spoiler! :
...let's take it strictly from a human perspective for a minute.
People are going to mourn Stan Lee's death. No argument.
Are there people more deserving of grief over their deaths than his? Partly debatable, but again, from a strictly human standpoint, I think most people would answer "yes." Strictly because Stan Lee's "sacrifice" wasn't as risky as others'. Such as someone in the military, or a cop, or any public servant who daily puts their life on the line for others.
Kratos
Spoiler! :
Again ,I find that very..reckless to say. I disagree that Stan Lee writing stories/creating a comic book and making millions of dollars for himself, is more of an impact or has left more of a legacy than any of the heroes I mentioned.
GA Contempt
Spoiler! :
Alright then, so what kind of impact are you truly looking for?
One that changed modern history? Affected people's lives?
Kratos
Spoiler! :
Nope.

The father that won't make it home to his wife and children, because he died trying to save someone from a fire. Or, a soldier that sacrificed himself by throwing himself on a grenade so his friends/others around him could survive...those impacts, are far more important, imo. That isn't to say there hasn't been an impact or that what Lee did isn't good or even impactful, but I don't think it compares.
Or the doctor that risks their lives over in Africa treating horrible sicknesses...missionaries in China risking their lives to spread the Gospel trying to save people eternally...
I'm not looking for any impact. I'm saying that I find it, disappointing, that our society will mourn Stan Lee's death more than it ever could/will other people that, imo, deserve the grief much more.
SkyeRangerDelta
Spoiler! :
I think part of the reason why this debate has been going on for this long and partly what Tourq may be touching on is this:

The perviews of someone's legacy and importance are not black and white defined. There is no quantifiable value you can enforce on someones impact on humanity or whatever you want to call it. The difference here is how everyone is looking at it. Some people like myself and moreso Kratos here believe that the impact that Lee had on his audience was not as powerful or the same as that of a soldier/firefighter/etc. I personally find that Lee's legacy here is important from a viewpoint that he enhanced the dreams of entertainers, writers, etc - that IS NOT TO SAY that someone couldn't have been influenced by a soldier's actions. Perhaps someone (such as my brother who is interested in the marines) gets to be like family with his squadmates? Perhaps they get deployed and that into a tight spot, given that moment, he could save his friends life from a grenade by sacrificing his own (to use Kratos' example).

Just my thoughts on that though. But the reason this has gone on like this is because one person cannot flat out say that Lee's life was more impactful than say General Patton's in WWII. That value is a preceptual one.

Ok, I go back to my paper now.
Ongurth
Spoiler! :
You guys ever have one of those moments when what you want to do, and what you know you should do, are two different things? smiley

Okay, so I'm admittedly biased as someone who for the longest time (that time may still be now), wanted to be a famous novelist. I have lots of heroes. Some are warriors. Some are story tellers. A handful are both, and some are neither.

I think there are different types of impacts, and different types of courage. A warrior or healer can have a dramatic impact on a very personal and tactile scale. Through one act of physical/intellectual courage, they can save a life (or many lives). A story teller is different. A story teller can have a powerful, broad impact. They can give people the courage to face their own emotional demons and overcome them. I know Stan Lee has saved lives- I personally know people who have not ended their lives because of his stories. I know others who have had the courage to face crippling situations because of his characters.

The courage and impact of both the warrior or healer and story teller are both needed to face the darkness in this world.

Where we get into trouble is when we say one is "better" than the other. I'm not sure such things can be measured. I've been there as paramedics saved one of my friends lives. I've also been there when a story teller's tale has saved others. I wouldn't trade either for the world.

So is it bad that so many people are mourning Stan Lee? No, not really. We appreciate those who have touched us directly and powerfully. Are there warriors that protect us without us knowing? Yes, and they should be praised, but that does not mean we should be unappreciative of those who we know have helped us through dark places. That is what Stan Lee did for many, and it is right to be appreciative of that. I think this is a bit of a false dichotomy. smiley
Kratos
Spoiler! :
I admit I'm biased as well, my entire family has served in the military and some of those family have sacrificed their lives. I do agree that there are authors that can have that type of impact, but I don't agree that Stan Lee did, specifically. Moses? Sure. Paul, yes sir. Stan Lee? I don't agree. While he did create fantastic entertainment and sure, he inspired people, but I certainly don't value that in the same way that I do someone sacrificing their lives for others. Or being willing to sacrifice their lives for others. Stan Lee made a ton of money ($50 mil, actually) to do what he did. While I won't disregard the idea that an author can have a massive impact on people's lives, it isn't the same, imo, as someone who risks their lives to save someone else's.
The Doctor
Spoiler! :
Going to start with a slightly more human approach to things, then tie our faith back into the mix at the end.

First, what does it truly mean to have had a significant impact on something, anything? Generally, the answer would be something along the lines of how different something would be without that impact. Take, for example, two close soldiers. While deployed, the two have one another’s back consistently. At one point, the first saves the second from an untimely death. Most would classify this relationship as having a significant impact on the life of the second. After all, the one saved the others life. But is that really the case?

Say, the second soldier never joined the army. The question is, does the first still live through deployment? I would argue that it is quite likely to remain true. The second soldier would have a different soldier in his place, and there is a decent chance that this new soldier would save the first one's life.

In this same fashion, there is nothing to suggest Stan Lee having never been born would have greatly changed the world. There could have just as easily been someone else who would rebel from DC, and set out to create competition. But that doesn’t mean Stan Lee wasn’t significant. After all, if the person doing it isn’t what made it significant, it must be the act itself, right?
SlickAl
Spoiler! :
I would have to say that on average soldiers, firefighters, police, etc., that put their life on the line can have an extremely large impact but that impact is typically limited to small groups of individuals such as those they saved, worked with, or directly impacted in some way. and this can be seen by looking at the honors they typically receive in their local communities when they pass; however, outside of that local community / individuals directly impacted by them I believe the impact of their lives typically isn't considered as ..........and reading the Doctors (MASSIVE) post part way through pretty much sums up where I was heading. So I'm going to shut up.
Global
Spoiler! :
Sorry I'm a little late to the party for the above discussion.. I'm in no way going to tell you who you can/can't mourn!! BUT remember this everyday you decide to get on here and have these types of discussions... God first then all the those that laid down their lives for you to have your life to discuss this type of stuff.

Personally my family has lost 4 members to war over the years... For me selling those short that sacrificed for others to carry on with the freedom WE HAVE far out weighs someone like Stan Lee
But that's me
Will Stan Lee be missed any less by his family then the solider/policeman/firefighter/etc that laid his/her life down.. no.. but for me and I know others too... their sacrifice carry's more weight for me then someone like Stan Lee making comic books. This doesn't mean he hasn't helped someone with his stories/characters.. In the end God will decided our merit..
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldn ... ledge.html

Please feel free to add to the conversation here. Remember if you are a Christian, God first and love your fellow fallen human. If not a Christian, please keep it civil. :)
word count: 2932
"We've just put a hit on the man that just got married." ~Winged
"Get a Sunder and run people over. That always makes you happy." ~Kes

User avatar
NeoJabez
Council Operations
Council Operations
Posts: 10570
Joined: June 5th, 2005, 7:00 am

Re: Did Stan Lee leave true lasting impact?

Post by NeoJabez » November 13th, 2018, 7:58 pm

This is such a great question, and it has, I think, the opportunity to teach us all something important about how human nature operates.

First...I don't think that anyone should be told that any one person's death is more or less important than any others. No one can be told who they can and cannot mourn, or for what reason.

Having said that, I would like to list a few psychological reasonings I think might play a part in this.

_________________________________________________________________________________________________


I know how it goes. People says "RIP" on Facebook all the time, and that's pretty much it. It's similar to "Facebook Activism" or "Facebook Politics", which is to say...it's pretty easy to 'raise awareness' for pretty much anything if all you have to do is click a button on your mouse or respond to a post once.

If all condolences in the world were shared via Facebook or Twitter, and not in person, or through memorial services or candle-lit vigils, mourning might lose it's meaning entirely.

So...Why do people tend to 'notice' the deaths of celebrities, or feel saddened by them MORE than the deaths of those people who have chosen to fight for their rights, freedoms, or protection from harm?

Why is the life of a famous artist seemingly more important than the life of someone who puts their life on the line for us all?

First, let's look at true heroes, who rarely receive the amount of response as celebrities do when they pass on:

1) Real heroes, like firemen, policemen, soldiers...If they do their job well, they are mostly invisible to everyone else. If you saw a soldier right outside your window, firing on the enemy, then you are in dire straits, no? The fact that you don't see what they go through each and every day on your behalf is part of the reason they are so heroic to you. They are unsung...They don't do what they do in public, for recognition or accolades, but because it's the right thing to do.

2) Most military people I know (as an example) actually feel uncomfortable when they are applauded or thanked for their service. They understand the sentiment, but they don't require it, if that makes sense. They don't fight because they want to be remembered for it, or because they hate the enemy before them. They do it because they love the people BEHIND them, that they are protecting and shielding.

3) First responders and those who fight and die for our freedom are mourned. They are mourned by their brothers in arms, by their hometowns, by their families, and many more. Just because everyone doesn't know the story of Diego Rincon, doesn't mean he didn't have a huge impact on his community by his passing.

The story of Diego Rincon:
Spoiler! :
Army Pfc. Diego Fernando Rincon
Died March 29, 2003 Serving During Operation Iraqi Freedom
19, of Conyers, Ga.; assigned to 2nd Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.; killed in a suicide car-bombing near Najaf, Iraq.

A Columbian immigrant and an avid musician and mechanic.
Diego Rincon loved his Mustang.

“It was spotless, with a great sound system, the whole nine yards,” said Jerry Smith, an English and drama teacher at Salem High School in Conyers, Ga., where Rincon graduated in 2000.

Before shipping out to the Middle East, Rincon, 19, showed off the car’s latest detailing to Smith. He promised his former drama coach that he would take him for a spin when he finished restoring the car after he got back from Iraq.

Rincon is one of four children in a family that immigrated to the USA from Colombia. He was killed Saturday, March 29, in a suicide bombing attack at a military checkpoint north of the city of Najaf. Three other Army soldiers also died in the attack, in which a taxi driver waved to the soldiers for assistance and then blew up the vehicle.

Rincon was “just full of energy, full of life,” Smith recalled. “He was very much a people person. He really enjoyed people, and people enjoyed him. Whatever Diego decided to do, he did with full vigor.”

At Salem High, Rincon was a gymnast, a cheerleader and an avid actor and singer in school productions. He played a soldier in A Piece of My Heart, a drama about Vietnam War nurses. And he played Oberon in A Midsummer Night’s Dream. He also sang in the musical Grease.

The mother of Rincon’s girlfriend said it was totally in character for the young soldier to come forward to help the Iraqi driver.

“He was doing what Diego would have done when summoned to help,” Leslie Montemayor told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. “He would have helped, and that’s how he died.”

On Monday, Rincon’s father talked with Smith. Smith said the man was in shock and was grieving. But he also promised to finish restoring his son’s Mustang.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________


I had the honor to meet and shake the hand of Diego's father, a man who goes everywhere with buttons on his shirt or jacket showing photos of his son. My understanding of the entire story is that Diego and the men with him who died were the very first American losses in Operation Iraqi Freedom.
The day I met Mr. Rincon, we were standing at his front door, next to the driveway in which his son's Mustang still sat parked.

Anyone in Conyers, GA. who saw that car on the roads knew immediately who it belonged to, what he had done for them, and that his father was devastated by his loss.

Due to news coverage and more, Diego's sacrifice, and his father's mourning were also well known all over the Atlanta, Georgia area.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________


Here's the flipside...And please keep in mind, I've met quite a few famous people myself, and really don't find myself starstruck by them, in fact, I was underwhelmed at how just plain human they were.

1) Musicians, actors, authors, and artists of all stripes CREATE things...It doesn't matter if they create characters, tell stories, make songs...

Human beings are very different from every other animal in that we don't just live in the here and now. We, of all forms of life in Creation, exist constantly taking both our past and our future into account. Following that logic, we are also the only animal who exists as much in reality as we do in our own thoughts and imaginations. We exist in escapist worlds of entertainment as much as in the real world of work and toil. (By the way, did the death of a fictional character ever cause you to cry?)

We make decisions based on past ones. We fear the future if we don't know what it brings. No other animal 'leaves' the present as much as we do, through memories or imagination.

As a result, the artistic works of "famous" people stick with us.


When someone plays a song by the late Nat King Cole, Baby Boomers all over the place will remember the youthful optimism they felt in times past when they heard that song for the first time, or the 500th time. Our minds choose to remind us of good things, and things we associate with warm memories. For most of us, we can remember the 'hit song' of the time, or some other famous association of the era.

Some people might go so far as to say that they were inspired to be something in life by the actions or deeds of a fictional person who never even existed. Or a person who did exist, but was only famous for one thing.

2) We often feel connected to particular celebrities because we identify THE PERSON with what effect they had on us at that moment in time in our past. Maybe an artist performed a song that stuck with you because something momentous happened to you. So, you associate that famous person (as well as their work) with what happened to you, good or ill. You've given that famous person a little real estate in your heart and mind, and when you lose them, it's just like losing anything or anyone else important to you.

3) "Collective Mourning" can connect many of us. Let's forget famous musicians and actors for a moment...Were you sorry to hear about the passing of Billy Graham? Can you imagine the outpouring of loss that may have accompanied the passing of C.S. Lewis? Feeling empathy on a large-scale is not that different from feeling it on a small scale, but it can have the effect of connecting people who otherwise might not have had common ground. We might, through our loss, find others who share our worldview and values that we did not have a connection with before the loss.

4) Sometimes when a famous person dies, it's how they died that affects us. If a famous person dies of the EXACT same cancer as someone you personally valued in your own life, it can be a sober reminder of that other person. Sometimes famous people remind us just how human they are because they are subject to the same foibles, the same diseases, the same ailments as all the rest of us. Sometimes, being reminded that everyone is human is okay, even if it takes someone who is famous for no apparent reason to remind us of that fact.

_________________________________________________________________________________________________


It is not disrespectful to the heroes among us if we mourn the loss of those who only entertained us. It does not diminish the ultimate sacrifices of useful citizens, when arguably less useful people pass.

Sometimes, the impact has nothing to do with a person's fame, it's just the event itself is memorable.

Here's a thought experiment for you: Name at least three people involved in the Kennedy Assassination in the 60s.

I was not alive then, but right off the top of my head, I can name Governor Connelly, John and Jacqueline Kennedy, Abraham Zapruder, and Lee Harvey Oswald. Clearly all of these people didn't die, but you still know the names.

Okay, now name three people involved with the 1986 Space Shuttle Challenger explosion...Teacher Christa McAuliffe, and uh.... Okay, that's harder...

Now...name three people by name from when the planes (either of them) hit the Twin Towers (either of them) on September 11, 2001, or name three of the first responders who died after coming to help...

Those who died in each of these incidents suffered no less tragic deaths than any other. All of the people involved in all three of these events saw hundreds of thousands or even millions of mourners.

But you can only name a few of the people involved. If Hugh Jackman or Lady Gaga (like them or dislike them) had been in one of the jets on 9-11, you'd never forget that fact, mourning or not, right?

_________________________________________________________________________________________________


In closing, I completely understand the camp that wonders why the "respect" is given to famous people who maybe don't deserve it, versus the unfamous people who do.

Believe me, as a father to an Army Sgt, I totally get it.

Having said that...Sometimes people have a bigger impact than we know. In Stan Lee's case, he was a very early and vocal opponent of racism and bigotry, and will always be remembered as such.

Maybe Stan Lee (Lieberman) didn't have a huge effect on your own life, but at the bare minimum, the reaction to his passing spurned this interesting conversation, didn't it?

Bless you all, just some thoughts to consider.
word count: 1987
If serving is below you, leadership is beyond you. - Anonymous

Coram Deo, Soli Deo Gloria

Image

User avatar
Kratos
Council Member
Council Member
Posts: 5630
Joined: May 19th, 2011, 7:50 pm
Steam Profile: joshfitz08
Location: Appleton, WI

Re: Did Stan Lee leave true lasting impact?

Post by Kratos » November 13th, 2018, 10:55 pm

I think what's being missed from my perspective, admittedly my own fault it's being left out, is we are arguing the difference between individual impact and societal impact. The main argument from the opposite side of my own is, he's helped individuals through tough times and has helped individuals garner some type of courage or strength to get them through a tough time. I obviously cannot argue that. It's completely fair to label that an impact. My question is how does that stand to a societal impact? I hold the opinion, that it doesn't stand up well.

I have a few questions/points.

1) The Bible is a fantastic document. I doubt many here would disagree with that statement. The authors of the Bible have had MASSIVE impacts of our entire world's society since its inception. Which was more impactful? The writings or what the writings were about?

Say the Bible is destroyed tomorrow. Every single one. Did Christ not still die on the cross for our sins? Did God not still create the universe and does He not still hold dominion over His creation?

Now... if Christ didn't die for us, and if God didn't create the universe...what is the Bible? A fairy tale that does nothing besides tell a fantastic story.

Am I suggesting the authors have no impact? No. Of course not. Would be a very foolish statement, but who had more impact? Jesus or the person who wrote about him? You could argue that some wouldn't have heard about it without the writings and that is absolutely true, but I don't think it's a stretch to argue Jesus' actions were the more important part of that particular equation.

2) If Stan Lee never writes marvel comics, as a society what happens? I would argue not much (as for society as a whole, not individuals). Would specific individuals be affected? Sure. I think the argument to that is, there are alternative comics/stories that Stan Lee didn't write, that would suffice for this...but that's neither here nor there. Basic question: What if Stan Lee never existed and no one else came up with "marvel"? I'll let those of you on the opposite side of the argument answer this if you'd like. As it's the grounds of your argument. I'll answer the one that is the grounds for mine.

What if our military personnel all went on serious strike tomorrow and no one took their place? What if every police officer in our country just ceased to exist tomorrow and they weren't replaced? What if every fire fighter, also, stopped existing? What if the Christians in the middle east and beyond, that are literally risking their lives to spread the gospel, stopped spreading the gospel? I could keep going, but I think you get it... the loss of those people and those positions would be DETRIMENTAL to our society as a whole. Our nation would be under attack almost immediately, and we would not be the USA for very long. The gospel would just...stop being spread in a part of the world that is as dark as it gets... and the examples continue as long as the examples of people that impact our society as a whole.

There are people that do what Stan Lee wrote about, btw. There are people that fight villains everyday. They don't wear a cape, or wear a cool costume, or fly, or climb buildings with just their hands, sure, but they do put themselves in between bad and good people in defense of the good.

What's getting lost here is, I'm not saying we shouldn't mourn Stan Lee's death. Mourn away, if you feel you should. What bothers me is, there will be a very large amount of mourning. There already has been, multiple news articles, face book posts (some of our very own), and very public displays of gratitude and grief for Stan Lee. That's fine, I don't feel the same way, personally, but that's fine. Do what you'd like.

Yet we do not, as a society, show the outward display of love and respect to the people in our society that without their sacrifice our society would at best be in shambles, and at worst not exist.

I'm not telling you to be more sorry for this person's death or that, I'm suggesting that we consider the idea that our society's priorities may be misplaced. I do think we CAN compare impacts and legacies. I think we DO, do that, all the time. This very conversation is because of that. There is much more of a public (I would call faux, for the majority of it) outpouring of grief and mourning over Stan Lee that is not shared when other people die. If your argument is I shouldn't be saying anyone else is MORE important than others, alright, fair enough, but that's what is happening right now in our society, it's just for Stan Lee.
word count: 862

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests